Expert Contribution

Where to Put Your Extra Cash

Got any extra cash laying around? 

Could be from an inheritance or maybe you just sold some of your employer’s stock. Or it could be that you have an investment to sell but you are holding off because you don’t know what to do with the proceeds. 

Well, here’s your answer. 

Over and above the cash you need in an emergency fund and for any net expenses over the next five years, all of your funds should be invested in your long-term portfolio. 

Further, you should know quite well how this portfolio will perform in a crash, because you are likely to experience several more in your lifetime. 

But that’s ok. Since these are funds you won’t need to spend for at least five years you will be able to ride out an overwhelming majority of those downturns. 

Historically speaking, the stock market recovers about 87% of the time after a crash by the fifth year. Those are great odds! 

For more details, check out a deeper analysis at www.BestFinLife. com/blog, but in this space I want to simply make the point that this can be very important. 

For a limited time, I am offering a completely FREE financial conversation on the topic of your choice. FREE, that is, from cost and also FREE from any sales pitch. Simply schedule your call here: www.calendly.com/bestfinlife/free-financial-conversation. 

Best Financial Life is a Registered Investment Advisor with the State of California and Joe Morgan is a fiduciary to his clients at all times. If you’d like to ensure your finances are on the right track, schedule a call with Joe at www.calendly.com/bestfinlife. 

By Joe Morgan, CFP®, CFA, Principal: Best Financial Life, Resident since 2004 


About The Author

Financial Advisor
Joe Morgan, CFP®, CFA
Best Financial Life
925-389-3889

Joe Morgan is a fee-only financial advisor who acts as an educator, guide, and protector of wealth to individuals and families. He created his own firm after a successful investment career because he wanted to help people find clarity in their aspirations, resources, and risks. When he’s not showing how financial advice doesn’t have to be dictated by stuffy suited men from Wall Street, he enjoys tennis at Blackhawk Country Club and hiking the Tri-Valley area.

View All Contributions